TechHui

Hawaiʻi's Technology Community

Information

Erlang Developers

A group for enthusiasts of Ericsson's peculiar but lovable programming language. Yeah message passing. We don't need any stinking locks!

Members: 13
Latest Activity: Feb 4, 2012

What is Erlang?

Erlang is a general-purpose concurrent programming language and runtime system. The sequential subset of Erlang is a functional language, with strict evaluation, single assignment, and dynamic typing. For concurrency it follows the Actor model. It was designed by Ericsson to support distributed, fault-tolerant, soft-real-time, non-stop applications.

Soure: Wikipedia - Erlang (programming language)

Discussion Forum

This group does not have any discussions yet.

Erlang News

Loading… Loading feed

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Erlang Developers to add comments!

Comment by Tim Dysinger on November 2, 2009 at 5:13am
Here some Lisp Flavored Erlang I coded in the form of a simple OTP app on a lay sunday. http://github.com/dysinger/lfe-otp-ping-pong
Comment by Tim Dysinger on October 31, 2009 at 10:43am
Anyway we are telling each other stuff we both know :) It's just fun to hack some erlang IMO
Comment by Tim Dysinger on October 31, 2009 at 10:31am
If I was going to go the bare-metal route I would def use webmachine.
Comment by Tim Dysinger on October 31, 2009 at 10:30am
I agree it's possible - I've done some mochiweb work myself. It's about the equiv of using rack when there is merb & rails - or java servlets vs gwt or python wsgi ws django. there are benefits to a framework if you want rapid progress on a web app.
Comment by Anders Conbere on October 31, 2009 at 9:50am
Tim I don't think it's as complicated as people are making it out to be :)

1) handle http requests / response
2) generate html / json as responses
3) clean data api

1) is pretty well handled by MochiWeb
2) there are some good html generators in erlang (herml, erlydtl, etc.)
3) I would avoid Mnesia here, but there are reasonable interfaces to key value stores that map well to Erlang.

It might not be as... "structured" as something like nitrogen, but It certainly isn't difficult. Maybe the nice clean solution in the space hasn't been written yet :)
Comment by Tim Dysinger on October 31, 2009 at 8:28am
Anders I would agree that nitrogen's use of records & it's .NET influence are two turn offs. What else do we have in erlang for web dev?
Comment by Stuart Malin on October 31, 2009 at 7:28am
Tim: Thanks for the comments - I will definitely explore Riak. Have also looked into Webmachine, and the two do seem designed to be integrated.
Comment by Tim Dysinger on October 31, 2009 at 7:23am
Riak has a lot of similarites to couchdb (key value store, json document w/ REST access) only it has these big pluses:

1) Riak automatically scales with more nodes. Couchdb is is a one-node solution whos ideas sprang from lotus notes and document "replication" and offline use. Riak was built to handle web-scale loads on N nodes (but also works on one node).

2) The map/reduce in Riak is erlang, giving it more HP to do things that JavaScript map/reduce can't.

3) There are native erlang apis for Riak (you don't have to use the JSon/REST interface).

4) The guys at Basho are super geniuses
Comment by Anders Conbere on October 31, 2009 at 7:20am
I always felt that the repurposing of records for nitrogen views was... pretty gross. Something like Haskell's combinator approach would appeal more to me.
Comment by Stuart Malin on October 31, 2009 at 5:36am
Oops - it seems the key-value store is "Riak", from Basho. I guess I'm behind the curve on awareness...
 

Members (13)

 
 
 

Sponsors

web design, web development, localization

© 2019   Created by Daniel Leuck.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service