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My education never covered this, so I am throwing it out there for all of the rocket scientists and true eggheads to ponder:

Since we are able to harness solar waves from the sun and convert these to power. Is it remotely possible to capture Microwaves and convert these to power? Has anyone researched this?

I'd sure like to hear anyones thoughts on this.

Gene...

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You mean electromag radiation? If so, U of Utah is doing research: http://www.physorg.com/news94310651.html. Hope i was relevant. :)

-Ayesha
Ayesha Wadud-Lefebvre said:
You mean electromag radiation? If so, U of Utah is doing research: http://www.physorg.com/news94310651.html. Hope i was relevant. :)

-Ayesha

Looks like this article is about harnessing far IR (instead of microwaves) for communication. Eugene is wanting to harness microwaves for power as opposed to using solar for power, for example. This is my interpretation of all this info, anyway.
Ya, you're probably on the right track Nate. Sorry Eugene. Intriguing stuff though. Thanks.

Nate Sanders said:
Ayesha Wadud-Lefebvre said:
You mean electromag radiation? If so, U of Utah is doing research: http://www.physorg.com/news94310651.html. Hope i was relevant. :)

-Ayesha

Looks like this article is about harnessing far IR (instead of microwaves) for communication. Eugene is wanting to harness microwaves for power as opposed to using solar for power, for example. This is my interpretation of all this info, anyway.
Ayesha Wadud-Lefebvre said:
Ya, you're probably on the right track Nate. Sorry Eugene. Intriguing stuff though. Thanks.

Nate Sanders said:
Ayesha Wadud-Lefebvre said:
You mean electromag radiation? If so, U of Utah is doing research: http://www.physorg.com/news94310651.html. Hope i was relevant. :)

-Ayesha

Looks like this article is about harnessing far IR (instead of microwaves) for communication. Eugene is wanting to harness microwaves for power as opposed to using solar for power, for example. This is my interpretation of all this info, anyway.
With this article, we may be on to something. This infrared light is use to communicate. Can this infrared light, injected into a phosphorous / silicone cell knock loose electrons?

Can the very waves we use for communications also produce enough power to recharge the battery of the communicator?

Am I going somewhere that is feasible?
Its certainly possible, but very, very inefficient. (path loss is an exponential fall-off, just like light.)

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